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OSHA investigates worker injury in Maryland

| Apr 1, 2014 | Workers' Compensation

Many people do not realize the serious impact a workplace accident can have on an employee and his or her family. In addition to medical bills, he or she could face lost wages during the period of recovery. In some serious situations, workers are never able to return to work. However, there are financial options available. A worker injury in Maryland will likely cause one man to look into these options as he struggles to recover from a workplace accident.

The 48-year-old man was reportedly repairing a storm drain in Maryland when the accident happened. He was working as an employee of W. L. Gary, a company that deals with mechanical contractors. His thumb was reportedly severed in the afternoon accident.

The man was transported by helicopter to an area hospital for treatment, where his current condition is unknown. The Maryland division of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is now investigating the accident. OSHA will determine what health and safety standards, if any, were violated leading up to the accident. If such standards were violated, the company could be ordered to pay a fine. Such an investigation can help prevent a similar accident in the future.

For employees who are victims of workplace accidents, states such as Maryland typically require employers to provide workers’ compensation coverage. Such benefits can help with the costs associated with a worker injury, including medical bills and lost wages. However, some people have found the path to compensation is long and complicated, requiring intimate knowledge the the processes and laws relating to such benefits.

Source: capitalgazette.com, “Worker flown to hospital after thumb nearly severed in Annapolis”, Ben Weathers, March 25, 2014

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