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Workplace accidents on the rise in Maryland and across the nation

| Apr 11, 2017 | Workplace Accidents

Maryland employers have the responsibility to minimize the risk of injury on job sites by obtaining necessary permits and training all workers about correct safety procedures. When able to spot and correct dangerous conditions, the number of workplace accidents decreases significantly. When caution is not of paramount concern, accidents and fatalities can happen.

A 54-year-old construction worker was killed last month in another state on an active job site. The union worker was struck and killed by a load that fell from a crane. It has been suggested that this accident may have resulted from extreme negligence. Officials believe construction workers may have failed to secure the load on the crane correctly. It is also noted that the contractors failed to obtain the permits required in order to operate dangerous equipment and to be able to work an active construction site.

With a recent uptick in workplace injuries, especially on construction sites, officials are taking notice. Non-union sites seem to be more susceptible to serious accidents than union sites. It has been suggested that this is due to the fact that union-led sites are safer due to more oversight by foremen.

Regardless of whether a company is union or non-union, workplace accidents still leave victims and/or their families struggling to recover. An on-the-job injury can result in short or long-term disability, loss of wages, medical bills and even loss of life. Victims, or their families when fatal accidents occur, can seek compensation for workplace injuries through the Maryland workers’ compensation program.

Source: therealdeal.com, “DOB investigating fatal crane accident on union site“, April 4, 2017

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